Bury the Guilt: Just Blog!

If there’s one feeling teachers know well, it’s guilt.  The list of things we didn’t get done today seems to grow ever longer.  There’s always one kid you haven’t really connected with, one assignment that hasn’t been graded and handed back yet, one project you haven’t started.  Or maybe there’s another teacher in your building that seems to be planned out for the next five months, while you haven’t planned past the next five minutes.  It’s easy to get caught up in all we HAVEN’T done instead of celebrating all that we HAVE done.

As teachers, there’s so much that we feel like we should be doing, particularly when it comes to technology.  There’s always an app to check out, a website to update, or a digital project idea to share with students.  The same is true, I believe, of blogging.  It’s something that we hear about all the time: all of the “good/connected/21st century/etc” teachers are blogging.  Maybe they are and maybe they aren’t, but either way, guilt can really get in the way of getting blog posts written.

We set some lofty goal to write everyday, or even every week, but we just don’t do it.  Work and life get in the way and we fall off the wagon.  And once we skip one day, it becomes harder to climb back on.  But why?  Just because we missed one blog post?

I am by no means a perfect blogger.  My posts are infrequent and they often go unread by others.  But I write them.  Sometimes I have writer’s block for weeks at a time and other times I have a list of a half dozen ideas or more that are waiting to be typed.  But whether you blog once a day, once a week, or once a month, the simple act of writing and reflecting is powerful.  If nothing else, it forces you to sit down and think about something you’re passionate about, passionate enough to want to share it with the world.  For me, it is often one of the few times during my day that I get slow down and just think.

So set a goal, or don’t.  Write, or don’t.  Do what feels best.  If writing brings you happiness, do it and do it often.  If it feels like a chore, it’s likely not bringing anything positive to your life.   If you enjoy blogging, then by all means set a goal and work to do it more and do it better.  If not, make like “Frozen” and let it go.  Give up the guilt that tells you that “everybody is doing it” and do what works for you.

I enjoy blogging, so I decided to accept the challenge from Nicholas Keith (@nkeithblend), a blended learning specialist from Texas, to blog for 30 days straight (30 Day Blog Binge, or 30DBB).  I have never blogged 30 days straight before.  I’ve never even blogged 3 days straight before.  Most of the time, I’m lucky if I get 3 posts out all month, and now I’m planning to do 10 times that.

We’ll see how I do.  So far, I’m on day 2 and I still have a list of potential posts ready to be written.  Either way, I’m going to give it my all.  Some days it just might not happen and other days I might have to write two posts to catch up.  Let’s do this.

To see what others are writing, check out the hashtag #30DBB.

One comment

  1. Andrea… good post. Any one who has tried blogging feels this guilt. I think I have tried blogging three separate times, but I am hoping it sticks this time. You line about how blogs are often “unread by others” made me smile! I often wonder “I am just talking to myself?”

    Like

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